Up to 55 Amazon reviews for The Business of Being Social

We’re really thrilled to see that The Business of Being Social now has 55 reviews on Amazon – with 40 of those five-star. Reviews are the lifeblood of books and while we are proud of the book, it’s great to see that others agree with us.

We thought we’d post the latest review by Hugo Minney in full as it neatly sums up what this social media book is all about. Take it away Hugo:

This book is about making money, not wasting it.

It would be easy to spend pages and pages explaining what tweeting is, and how much fun it is. It would be easy to jump straight in at the “How” (as in, “this is HOW you do it”), forgetting that a busy business doesn’t really want to spend any time at all on something that costs but doesn’t deliver a return. So this book doesn’t do that.

It starts with a foundation – this is what businesses do, and this is what they should do, and most importantly, this is what they can expect to get back (WHY social marketing).

Then it goes on to explain, step by step, WHAT social marketing is. The undercurrent is that humans have communicated and carried out commerce for years – well hundreds of thousands of years actually – and it’s only been in the last 2-3 hundred years that we’ve tried to rely on push marketing or loud posters selling snake oil.

If you can’t necessarily prove the benefits of marketing this way, that’s probably because it’s difficult to prove. Social marketing, with all of this modern technology, is a return to old-fashioned conversation and commerce, which is why it caught on so quickly and is proving so successful.

With the foundations in place, Carville (sic) and Taylor can explain HOW to do social marketing. And they point out that it’s very much like a good old-fashioned conversation. In a conversation, you won’t make friends or influence people if you simply race in and start shouting.

The rules (for success) are always the same – decide what you want, listen to find a group of people who seem like the right crowd, converse to build relationships (usually by agreeing with the people closest to your point of view), and then, and only then, have you won the right to tell them about whatever you are selling.

Carville (sic) & Taylor repeat this again and again – don’t start posting or tweeting, decide what your objective is. Lots of companies don’t know what their aim is, so they are remarkably accurate at getting it. Your objective is probably to sell more product to this target client base. OK where do you find the client base?

Are they on twitter with a hashtag that they tend to watch and chat under (a hashtag seems to be a little like a chat room – a marker that you can search for to follow conversations about a particular subject). Are they on facebook, or linkedin, or Google, or somewhere else? You don’t want to waste time building relationships with people who, no matter how much they like you, simply have no use for your product. Find your potential clients, and build the relationship.

They discuss the characteristics of the different media – on Twitter you probably have to post every few hours, on Facebook every day or so, on LinkedIn every week, and so on. They discuss what you post – a bit of humanity, a bit of professionalism. Above all, be yourself (but not unprofessional).

They also discuss blogs and other ways to build a community, a committed group who not only will buy your products, but will tell you what else they want so you can sell it, and will tell you what’s right about your product (do more of this) and what’s wrong (put it right). A community of friends who are all friends of you.

A very useful book. Also very well written and easy to follow. One to keep on the shelf with markers in for future reference.

Click here to read all the reviews – including the less flattering ones! Thank you to all of you who have left comments – they are all appreciated!

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